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THE MISKATONIC INSTITUTE OF HORROR STUDIES 2012/2013 CURRICULUM NOW ONLINE!

02/09/2012 20:53 by Kier-La Janisse

The Miskatonic Institute of Horror Studies is an organization based in Montreal, Canada that offers a variety of theory and production-based workshops for youth aged 14-29, and is a non-profit, community-based endeavour through which established horror writers, directors and programmers/curators help enthusiastic fans of the genre to gain a critical perspective.

CURRICULUM + REGISTRATION

Miskatonic's 2012 curriculum begins weekly classes in the fall, with the occasional weekend class by visiting instructors. Classes may require reading or viewing homework. Courses in the 2012 fall semester lineup - and select courses scheduled for the spring 2013 semester - are listed below, with the remainder of the spring 2013 lineup to be announced here in early fall 2012.

Students can register for individual classes, or can pre-register for an immersive year-round curriculum. Registration prices vary depending on course length and are listed on the individual course description pages. Curriculum may vary from year to year.

THE FANTASIA SCHOLARSHIP

Sometimes the youth who would get the most out of these courses are deterred by the professional registration fees. This is where Fantasia has stepped in to help! Fantasia offers five scholarships per school year (September-May) to would-be participants who are unable to cover the costs of yearly registration. To apply for the Fantasia Scholarship you need to be between the ages of 14-29 and be willing to fill out the one-page application form available for download on the Miskatonic website. To apply for a scholarship, download and fill out the form HERE and email the completed for to bigsmashproductions@gmail.com.

UPCOMING COURSES:

deep red

WRITTEN IN BLOOD: SCORING HORROR CINEMA

2012-09-22

Since the early days of tent-bound magic lantern shows, music has accompanied the grand illusion of motion pictures. This lecture by Fangoria Magazine's Chris Alexander will not only discuss the history of musical composition in the horror film, it will specifically illustrate some of the finest examples of how music can radically accentuate and dictate an audience’s sensory and emotional connection to imagery. FREE ADMISSION!

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halloween mirror

WATCHERS IN THE WOODS: REFLEXIVITY IN HORROR CINEMA

2012-10-08

The critical frenzy around the recent postmodern horror film, The Cabin in the Woods (2012), as a game-changer or 'reinvention' of the horror genre suggests that journalists (and even fans) have forgotten that horror is always-already a reflexive genre. This introductory class will give students a pathway into the critical study and discussion of horror through healthy debate around the way popular (and sometimes scholarly) discourse problematically frames horror as constantly in crisis and in need of rejuvenation.

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school of shock

SCHOOL OF SHOCK: PAIN AND PLEASURE IN THE CLASSROOM SAFETY FILM

2012-10-15, 2012-10-15 - 2012-10-22

For many genre fans, a love affair with horror and the grotesque began early on, sometimes fuelled by unlikely sources. One of these was the classroom safety film, which for many kids was their first time seeing other children threatened by true danger, being confronted with a combination of gore effects and actual accident footage, and being offered a pictorial glimpse at things their parents didn’t want to talk about.

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creeper

FRAGMENTS OF THE MONSTER: RECOVERING FORTIES HORROR

2012-10-29, 2012-10-29 - 2012-12-03

This six-week course will attempt to revise and reframe persistent claims in scholarly discourse that 1940s horror is somehow inferior to a “classical” or “canonical” mode of horror in the 1930s. Within this framework, the creepers, chillers and thrillers of the 1940s become lost—the result of favoring monolithic binaries, or strict divisions within genre classifications, between high art and low art, auteurs and craftsman, and major studios and poverty row. Expect to see films you may not have ever heard of before in this class!

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lost hearts

A GHOST STORY FOR CHRISTMAS: A BRITISH HOLIDAY HORROR TRADITION

2012-12-10

To kick off the holiday break, we’ll say farewell to the Fall 2012 semester with a one-off class celebrating the British holiday horror tradition of the BBC’s seminal 'A Ghost Story for Christmas' series that ran from 1971 to 1978.

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rod serling

SMALL SCREENS, BIG CHILLS: CLASSIC AMERICAN TV HORROR

2013-01-21, 2013-01-21 - 2013-02-25

As we reflect upon the recent popularity of horror melodramas such as True Blood, The Walking Dead and American Horror Story, it becomes essential to explore the influence of earlier examples of TV horror. This six-week course looks at shows such as Twilight Zone, Dark Shadows, Outer Limits, Thriller, One Step Beyond and more, plus the golden age of made-for-TV features and the tradition of TV horror hosts.

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castel twins

DREAMING REVOLT: Jean Rollin, the French Fantastique, and Beyond

2013-03-18, 2013-03-18 - 2013-04-01

A filmmaker ridiculed by film critics and genre fans alike, Jean Rollin (1938-2010) has only recently begun to find acceptance in his native France. Rollin’s films have been described in often paradoxical ways, from poetic and literary, to absurdist and oneiric, to technically inept and narratively impenetrable. Hence, Rollin films occupy a liminal space in film history - where art-house horror mixes with sexual taboo, where the fantastique tradition mixes with the “serial film,” and where lyricism mixes with the macabre - resulting in a disarmingly unique and personal cinematic vision.

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krimi

KRIMI-NOLOGY: THE LURID WORLD OF THE GERMAN KRIMI FILM

2013-04-08, 2013-04-08 - 2013-04-22

Predating the Italian giallo by several years, and intersecting with it on many occasions subsequently, was an important but oft-neglected strand of crime cinema: The German Krimi film. Based largely on the work of the British pulp crime writer Edgar Wallace (1875-1932) who was incredibly popular in Weimar-era Germany, these lurid tales of underworld gangs, criminal masterminds and masked killers expanded upon both the cinematic terrain of Fritz Lang’s Dr. Mabuse films and the serials of Louis Feuillade.

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